Wear and tear in vulnerable brain areas lead to lesions linked to cognitive decline

Date:

Lesions (red) occur near areas that must be further stretched to accommodate pressure changes in the circulating cerebrospinal fluid. When the wall of the CSF-filled ventricle (black) thins, the CSF leaks into the brain tissue (gray) and creates lesions.Credit: Stevens Institute of Technology

As our brain ages, small lesions begin to appear in the bundles of white matter that carry messages between our neurons. Lesions can damage this white matter and cause cognitive impairment. Researchers at Stevens Institute of Technology are now explaining not only the location of these lesions, but also how they occur in the first place.

This work, led by Stevens Weikenmeier, an assistant professor of mechanical engineering, brain More than a neural circuit that underpins how thoughts are formed and memories are created.It also Physical object Glitch and mechanical failure are likely to occur. “The brain is fragile, Vulnerable area“Especially in the aged brain, we need to look at its biomechanical properties to better understand how things go wrong,” Wykenmeier said.

These lesions are known as deep and periventricular white matter hyperintensity because they appear as bright white spots on MRI scans, but are not well understood. But they are not uncommon. Most people have some by the time they reach their 60s, and changes only increase with age. The more lesions that accumulate and the faster they grow, the more likely they are to have cognitive deficits, from memory to motor deficits.

Weickenmeier used MRI scans from eight healthy subjects in collaboration with Valley Visser, now a PhD student at the University of Zurich, and Henry Rusinek, a radiologist at the NYU Grossman School of Medicine. Developed a separate computer model of the brain. The team mapped the strain on the ventricular wall, the inner wall of a fluid-filled chamber deep in the brain, as a wave of pressure pulses through the subject’s cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). They found that hyperintensities tended to occur near areas that had to be further extended to accommodate pressure changes in the circulating CSF. Because such areas wear lightly, CSF can leak into the brain and cause lesions.

Johannes Weickenmeier, a mechanical engineer at Stevens Institute of Technology, talks about the role of brain mechanics in the development of lesioned brain disease.Credit: Stevens Institute of Technology

Cell wall A line that wears out the ventricles over time, like a balloon that inflates and contracts. Also, the stress is not uniform. Because it is defined by the shape of the ventricles, it is possible to predict where these disorders will occur. Occurs. ”

This model provides a simple physics-based explanation for the location of these lesions, revealing that mechanical loading “must be the leading cause of the development of the disease.”

Recently published team survey Scientific ReportsUsed 2D imaging to show a cross-section of the brain, but Weickenmeier’s team then expanded their research to a complete 3D model of the brain. Next, Weickenmeier wants to directly study the movement of the ventricular wall using advanced MRI techniques developed by Stevens.

Johannes Weickenmeier, a mechanical engineer at Stevens Institute of Technology, talks about how brain mechanics contributes to underlying disease.Credit: Stevens Institute of Technology

In the long run, the team’s findings may enable the development of new treatments for lesions. Drug treatment usually has difficulty reaching the affected area across the blood-brain barrier, but new studies suggest that it may be possible to direct the drug directly to the lesion through a leak in the ventricular wall. “It’s still a long way to go and we didn’t study it directly,” Weikenmeier warned. “But that’s an interesting possibility.”

Johannes Weickenmeier, a mechanical engineer at Stevens Institute of Technology, talks about his work on how brain lesions are formed.Credit: Stevens Institute of Technology

According to Weikenmeier, the broader point from the team’s research is that the aging process of the brain is mediated by physical processes such as circulating blood and cerebrospinal fluid pressure. This emphasizes the need for healthy behavior that can reduce the strain on the brain, such as exercising well and avoiding harmful substances.


The study found a long-standing football-related MRI brain lesion


For more information:
Valery L. Visser et al, peak stretch of ependymal cells overlaps with the location of periventricular white matter lesions. Scientific Reports (2021). DOI: 10.1038 / s41598-021-00610-1

Quote: Damage to vulnerable brain areas was obtained from https: //medicalxpress.com/news/2021-12-vulnerable-brain-areas-lesions-linked on December 17, 2021. It leads to lesions related to (17th of March). html

This document is subject to copyright. No part may be reproduced without written permission, except for fair transactions for personal investigation or research purposes. Content is provided for informational purposes only.

Wear and tear in vulnerable brain areas lead to lesions linked to cognitive decline Source link Wear and tear in vulnerable brain areas lead to lesions linked to cognitive decline

The post Wear and tear in vulnerable brain areas lead to lesions linked to cognitive decline appeared first on California News Times.

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Share post:

Popular

More like this
Related

We Have to Pass the ‘Inflation Reduction Act’ to See How it Works (VIDEO)

Where have we heard this before? White House Press Secretary...

Singer Michelle Branch arrested in Nashville for domestic assault – Tampa, Florida

Tampa, Florida 2022-08-12 13:22:22 – NASHVILLE, Tennessee — Singer...

GOP AG Candidate DePerno and His IT Expert to Face Michigan Supreme Court

Last night in New Mexico, election expert Jeff Lenberg...

Longtime Iron Range Sen. David Tomassoni, who battled ALS, dies at 69

2022-08-12 13:08:15 – David Tommasoni, a Chisholm native who...