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    US announces $20 million deal to launch high-tech weather satellites in space – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2021-10-01 00:58:00 –

    The United States aims to launch a group of small satellites to fill a significant gap in its ability to foresee the dangers of precipitation, such as the deluge that overwhelmed northeastern cities in early September. The US Air Force announced a contract of about $ 20 million on Thursday. Tomorrow.io will develop and deploy an entire constellation of small satellites equipped with advanced radar to measure precipitation from space. Currently, of the more than 3,000 active satellites orbiting the Earth, only one has that capability. “This is a problem,” he said. “It’s a big deal, and so far the agency doesn’t want any more.” Its orbital satellite, known as the Global Precipitation Measurement Core Observation Satellite, is a counterpart of NASA and Japan. It was launched in February 2014 by a Japanese counterpart. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. The observatory costs about $ 1 billion, which is larger than a school bus, but it can do things that other satellites can’t. Unlike most meteorological satellites, which can only observe the outermost layers of storms, GPM satellites can “see” clouds and more accurately predict when, where, and how much rain or snow will fall. The satellite will also integrate data measuring precipitation from existing satellite groups operated by a consortium of international partners. This type of data is important in predicting extreme weather events. When the wreckage of Hurricane Aida struck the northeast, killing at least 52 people from Maryland to Connecticut, the National Meteorological Authority said 24 hours ago “heavy rains and potentially significant flushes, cities, and river floods.” Warned about. However, the historic amount of rain that fell on New York City (more than 3 inches per hour) still surprised city and state officials. “I didn’t know that between 8:50 pm and 9:50 pm last night. Heaven would literally open and bring the Niagara Falls water level to the streets of New York,” he said. The United States has a network of ground precipitation radars. But many parts of the world do not, including two-thirds of the surface of the ocean-covered Earth. These areas, as well as the vast areas of China, Russia and Africa, are of great interest to the US military as they are largely unaffected by ground-based precipitation radar. If you go to these areas, there is no working meteorological system on the ground. .. And even if they do exist, the United States doesn’t really have access to them. And that effect, I can tell you as a pilot, which will affect all decisions you make in the army, “said former pilot Ray Goffer, Israeli Air Force and co-founder of Tomorrow.io. “What we have done is to make the radar equipment smaller,” he told CNN. “We changed it from a school bus-sized device to one about the size of a mini-refrigerator.” The size reduction is much cheaper to launch a satellite. Gopher provides a cost-effective solution to decades-old problems, freeing federal agencies to focus on long-term priorities, much like SpaceX helped NASA. By doing so, I believe his company can support the US military and the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. “We really think of ourselves as SpaceX in the weather,” Goffer said. “Weather is one of the last domains to date without major private sector investment and major innovation.” Tomorrow.io’s first satellite will be launched in late 2022. The company told CNN that NASA officials had about 32 small satellites in operation by the end of 2024. “But it’s very difficult.” It takes an average of 2-3 days for GPM’s core satellites to “refresh” or scan the entire globe. Tomorrow.io aims to reduce its refresh rate to once an hour. Expanding global radar coverage can significantly improve forecast accuracy, especially as climate change contributes to more extreme weather. Dan Slagen, Chief Marketing Officer at Tomorrow.io, said. “Therefore, it would be very useful for these types of storms, especially if we could increase the refresh rate from space.”

    The United States aims to launch a group of small satellites to fill a significant gap in its ability to predict the danger of precipitation, such as the deluge that struck northeastern cities in early September. ..

    The U.S. Air Force announced Thursday that it has signed a contract with Tomorrow.io for approximately $ 20 million to develop and deploy all constellations of small satellites equipped with advanced radar to measure precipitation from space.

    Currently, of the more than 3,000 active satellites orbiting the Earth, only one has that capability.

    “This is a problem,” a NASA official told CNN. “It’s about paying a fortune, and so far government agencies don’t want to do anything more.”

    Its orbiting satellite known as Global Precipitation Measurement Plan Core Observatory SatelliteWas launched in February 2014 by NASA and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. The observatory costs about $ 1 billion, which is larger than a school bus, but it can do things that other satellites can’t. Unlike most meteorological satellites, which can only observe the outermost layers of storms, GPM satellites can “see” clouds and more accurately predict when, where, and how much rain or snow will fall.Satellite Integrate data to measure precipitation By an existing group of satellites operated by a consortium of international partners.

    This type of data is important in predicting extreme weather events. When the wreckage of Hurricane Aida struck the northeast, killing at least 52 people from Maryland to Connecticut, the National Meteorological Authority said 24 hours ago “heavy rains and potentially significant flushes, cities, and river floods.” Warned about. However, the historic amount of rain that fell on New York City (more than 3 inches in an hour) still surprised city and state officials.

    “We didn’t know that between 8:50 pm and 9:50 pm last night, the heavens would literally open and the water levels of Niagara Falls would be brought to the city of New York,” said New York Governor Cathy. Hokuru said after the grave. Loss of life.

    The more precipitation radars in space, the more accurate the forecasts on Earth.

    The United States is equipped with a network of ground precipitation radars. But many parts of the world do not, including two-thirds of the surface of the ocean-covered Earth. These areas, as well as the vast areas of China, Russia and Africa, are of great interest to the US military as they are largely unaffected by ground-based precipitation radar.

    “When I go to these areas, there are no working meteorological systems on the ground. Even if they do exist, the United States doesn’t really have access to them. And its impact, I tell you as a pilot. Rei Goffer, a former Israeli Air Force pilot and co-founder of Tomorrow.io, told CNN.

    “What we have done is to make the radar equipment smaller,” Goffer said. “From a school bus-sized instrument, I made it about the size of a mini-refrigerator.”

    Due to the reduced size, the cost of launching the satellite will be much lower. Goffer, in the same way SpaceX helped NASA, provides a cost-effective solution to decades-old problems, freeing federal agencies to focus on long-term priorities. , I believe his company can support the US military and the US National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

    “We really think of ourselves as SpaceX in the weather,” Goffer said. “Weather is one of the last domains that has never seen large-scale investment and large-scale innovation from the private sector.”

    The first satellite of Tomorrow.io is scheduled to be launched in late 2022, and the company hopes to be able to operate a full constellation of about 32 small satellites by the end of 2024.

    “I wouldn’t bet on them,” a NASA official told CNN. “But it’s very challenging.”

    GPM’s core satellites take an average of 2-3 days to “update” or scan the entire globe. Tomorrow.io aims to reduce its refresh rate to once an hour. Expanding global radar coverage can significantly improve forecast accuracy, especially as climate change contributes to more extreme weather.

    Dan Slagen, Chief Marketing Officer at Tomorrow.io, said: “Therefore, it would be very useful for these types of storms, especially if we could increase the refresh rate from space.”

    US announces $20 million deal to launch high-tech weather satellites in space Source link US announces $20 million deal to launch high-tech weather satellites in space

    The post US announces $20 million deal to launch high-tech weather satellites in space – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania appeared first on Eminetra.

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