Top Strategies for Dealing with “Dissatisfied Employees” —and Why They Don’t Work

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Employees are more likely to publish workplace complaints as well as demand higher wages, better terms and the right to work from home.

Here are the main strategies for dealing with speaking staff and why they don’t work:

1. Rub them

Facebook’s approach to criticism from former product managers Francis Hogen It was to portray her as a junior and ignorant — “I have worked for the company for less than two years, have no direct reports, have never attended a decision meeting with executives — and have not tackled this subject. I have witnessed that more than six times, the problem of the problem. ”

A lawyer defending Theranos founder Elizabeth Holmes in her fraud trial portrayed as an “incompetent” whistleblower Adam RosendorfBefore he left, he was a lab director at a blood test startup, claiming the company was a scam.

But the reliable term is “dissatisfaction.” It was a phrase to his former spokesman Stephanie Grisham after Donald Trump wrote a book that tells everything last month. It has been used to tar critics by hundreds of companies, including both Bill Gates and Mark Zuckerberg’s family offices.

The weakness is that it is a clear statement. They would obviously be dissatisfied or not complaining! That doesn’t mean they’re wrong. The personal attack approach can fail because it does not address the issues raised by the unfortunate ex-employee.

2. Don’t hire in the first place

This is an innovative idea by Brian Armstrong, Coinbase CEO. This week, Armstrong was concerned about the critical media coverage of top tech companies and suggested hiring only “independent thinkers isolated from prejudiced third parties.”

It’s unclear how the independent Armstrong really wants this idea.he Banned political debate at work a year ago And one in twenty staff at a cryptocurrency company then quit. Insulated is a more effective word.

However, this risks creating an echo chamber. More diverse opinions may have prevented Coinbase from making a false attempt to recently fight the Securities and Exchange Commission. And as every company grows, its ability to maintain common beliefs constantly diminishes.

3. Silence them

For years, the preferred way to handle serious complaints has been (preferably small) cash bundles and watertight nondisclosure agreements. This solution is declining.

Former Pinterest public policy staff, Ifeoma Ozoma, resigned from a social media company last year and became public, claiming racism.After defeating her NDA, she continued Campaign to prevent victims of harassment and discrimination from being gagged.. On Thursday, California passed this protection by law. Similar legislation has been proposed in Ireland, another major hub for the world’s largest technology companies. Richard Rice, a Newyork-based employment lawyer, said:

This goes beyond the serious claims of harassment and discrimination. As Reice points out, more and more people are feeling the right to criticize their previous workplace. “One of the things that makes it possible is that we have a group of employees who can afford the position.” It’s no coincidence that many high-profile examples come from high-paying tech departments.

In the face of the failure of existing strategies, companies can only admit cheating if it exists and fight the facts otherwise. You also need to tighten access to your data to reduce the chance of leaks. This is an ironic result for tech companies built on the idea that information wants to be free.

Top Strategies for Dealing with “Dissatisfied Employees” —and Why They Don’t Work

Source link Top Strategies for Dealing with “Dissatisfied Employees” —and Why They Don’t Work

The post Top Strategies for Dealing with “Dissatisfied Employees” —and Why They Don’t Work appeared first on Eminetra.

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