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    This Breast-Cancer Ribbon Has a Different Take on Pink. Here’s What It Means

    It’s a sad fact to know someone that almost everyone had today breast cancer.. But there is one fact that not everyone knows. It is to ensure that 30% of people who “defeat” early-stage breast cancer will eventually relapse as follows: Stage IVAlso called, advanced or Metastatic breast cancer.. This means that the disease has spread to other parts of the body. This is a diagnosis with a life expectancy of only 24-36 months. MBC is the only form that kills breast cancer.Still, MBC claims 115 lives every day (“”Like an airplane falling from the sky every day”), Less than 5% of US breast cancer funding raised is used to research new treatments.

    Metavivor Metastatic Breast Cancer Ribbon Charm, $ 5

    Courtesy Metaviver..

    These shocking statistics explain why more and more people are adopting a rethinked breast cancer recognition ribbon that goes beyond pink.Created by self In 1992, the readily recognizable Pink Ribbon is closely linked to the early detection and blessing of survivors, but it does not survive or “defeat” the MBC, it only gains time through treatment. Therefore, the Tricolor Metastatic Breast Cancer Ribbon aims to raise awareness of the need to fund the development of life-prolonging therapies. Among them, green represents the victory of spring over winter and the victory of life over death. The teal symbolizes healing and spirituality. A thin pink ribbon overlay indicates metastatic cancer that has started in the breast.

    One exciting initiative that helped Metastatic breast cancer The mainstream of Ribbon Go is an annual event that sheds light on its colors and their causes. Literally beautiful.in the meantime #LightUpMBCHundreds of iconic landmarks around the world are illuminated in green, pink and turquoise. Over 225 sites span all 50 states and beyond, from skyscrapers like One World Trade Center to natural wonders like Niagara Falls. On October 13th (National Metastatic Breast Cancer Awareness Day), viewers can: Find a local landmark You can tune to #LightUpMBC Live to visit directly or take everything from the comfort of your home. This is a virtual perk that starts at 8:30 pm Eastern Standard Time.On air LiveXLive, Facebook live, YouTube, When METAvivor.org/lightupmbcThe show was spoken of by illuminated landmarks around the world, as well as live music performances by Kristin Chenoweth, Rage Against the Machine’s Tom Morello, and Matchbox Twenty’s Rob Thomas. Featuring an inspiring MBC story. Another highlight of the year: Drone Racing League pilot PhluxyAunt is a breast cancer survivor, jumping over the I-35W Bridge and Capella Tower in Minneapolis and taking spectacular aerial photographs of its sparkling MBC-recognized colors. The show is co-sponsored by television personality Katie McGee and a motivational speaker. Tami Eagle, Who lived with MBC and created Eagle method Others deal with uncertainty, build resilience, Make every day meaningful..


    #LightUpMBC

    Some of the landmarks lit up in green, pink and teal at last year’s #LightUpMBC event.Click here for a complete list of Landmarks participating in 2021..

    The perk, which raised over $ 100,000, featured inspirational stories from patient ambassadors like Chawnte Randall, who are raising awareness of the fact that MBC mortality is 40% higher in black women.The author of the next book, Adiva Bernie Make a margarita when life gives you a cactusDee Lakhani Shravah, who found a lump during a self-examination and was diagnosed with MBC shortly before her 40th birthday. Veteran Kirby Lewis talked about his mastectomy (yes, because men also get breast cancer), and three mothers, Eva Crawford, talked about why pink wasn’t enough. The event also included music performances by Goo Goo Dolls’ John Rzeznik and Bon Jovi’s David Bryan.

    The first igniter of #LightUpMBC came from Laura Inahara, a New Hampshire woman who lost her best friend Jessica Moore in a transfer. breast cancer.. One day, Moore, a basketball coach at Varsity Girls, was crouched during the match, resulting in prolonged pain. As a nurse, she knew that her injury should heal faster. After seeing a doctor, she learned that she had metastatic breast cancer. This means that the disease has already progressed and spread to the bones, even though there are no other symptoms. She was only 32 years old. She fought the disease for four years and died at the age of 36. “She thought it would be great to illuminate the MBC landmarks as a way to raise awareness before Jessica died,” says Inahara.The person who established the group called Moore Fight Moore Strong In honor of her friend. In October 2017, five months after Moore’s death, the group set fire to its first landmark, the Memorial Bridge near Jessica’s hometown in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

    Inahara, a mother who works during the day, sat down every night and began working on expanding #LightUpMBC.Currently, the annual event is the main source of donations via Metaviver, Toward research on treatments that can turn stage IV breast cancer into a non-fatal, chronic disease. “”[Metavivor remains] “The only US organization dedicated to granting annual grants for peer-reviewed Stage IV breast cancer research,” explains Inahara. “That’s what it takes to find a cure and stop losing more than 43,000 lives from breast cancer each year. We are confident that we can get more research funding. I don’t have any friends who die of this disease anymore. It’s often misunderstood that there is a cure for breast cancer. I want to share it with someone who asks me not. “

    This Breast-Cancer Ribbon Has a Different Take on Pink. Here’s What It Means Source link This Breast-Cancer Ribbon Has a Different Take on Pink. Here’s What It Means

    The post This Breast-Cancer Ribbon Has a Different Take on Pink. Here’s What It Means appeared first on California News Times.

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