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    Their camps blown away by Hurricane Ida, Lake Maurepas residents weigh rebuilding; ‘This is life’ | Environment – New Orleans, Louisiana

    New Orleans, Louisiana 2021-09-14 05:00:00 –

    In the days after Hurricane Aida was torn into Louisiana, large chunks of backed up water and shattered debris were agitated in the normally quiet swamps of Lake Maurepas, keeping George Bennett away from his home. rice field.

    By this weekend, two weeks after the storm, the water level was low enough for a 70-year-old kid to boat to his Jones Island home, where he was fishing, usually four days a week, before the hurricane.

    Bennett already had a good idea of ​​what he would find when he went out. His nephew bravely confronted the high waters a few days ago to take a picture of his house.

    The structure of the small blue A-frame sat diagonally about 20 yards from its foundation when its owner sifted the debris boards and appliances scattered around the swamp. Its roof was destroyed by Aida’s howling winds and eight feet of storm surge.

    The door of the otherwise intact blue hut, torn from the hinges, lay on a pile of grass in a muddy swamp. The other two houses, where the storm tore from the ground, formed a trio with Bennett at the water’s edge.



    George Bennett (right) is investigating the damage caused by an extratropical cyclone in Manchac, Louisiana, on Saturday, September 11, 2021, after the storm passed through the area almost two weeks ago. The combination of eight feet of storm surge and howling winds was incorporated into the swamps on the northeastern shore of Lake Maurepas, causing enormous damage to camps in the area, which is only accessible by water.





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    George Bennett points out where the hut water rose during an extratropical cyclone in Manchac, Louisiana on Saturday, September 11, 2021, after the storm passed through South Louisiana about two weeks ago. .. The combination of eight feet of storm surge and howling winds was incorporated into the swamps on the northeastern shore of Lake Maurepas, causing enormous damage to camps in the area, which is only accessible by water.



    The fisherman rang desperately and decided while investigating the wreckage. Even after spending his life in Southern Louisiana, he was unable to prepare for Aida’s wrath. His voice was at a loss and he admitted that there was no insurance policy to cover the costs of raw materials and household items needed for reconstruction. This is a tough job in this lakeside community, which is only accessible by boat.

    Bennett has been in Manchac since he was a boy in the 1960s. He built the camp in 1978 and for the past eight years the house has more or less functioned as his full-time home. There is no doubt that he will rebuild.

    “This is life here,” he said. “You will be demolished and rebuilt. If you want to be here, there is nothing else you can do.”



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    A house destroyed by Hurricane Ida in Manchac, Louisiana on Saturday, September 11, 2021 after a storm struck about two weeks ago. The combination of eight-foot storm surges and howling winds from Lake Maurepas and Lake Pontchartrain caused enormous damage to camps in areas that were incorporated into swamps and accessible only by water.





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    From left to right, Greg Pizzolat, Tangipahoa parish councilor Kim Coates, and George Bennett suffered damage to a home in Manchac, Louisiana on Saturday, September 11, 2021 after an extratropical cyclone struck about two weeks ago. I investigated. The combination of eight feet of storm surge and howling winds was incorporated into the swamps on the northeastern shore of Lake Maurepas, causing enormous damage to camps in areas accessible only by water.



    Of the approximately 200 homes built in the isolated wetlands between Lake Maurepas and Lake Pontchartrain, Aida blew about 30 from its foundation. The storms that hit the area caused gusts and storm surges of over 100 mph. Many other homes lost roofs, porch, sheds, doors and furniture as swamps sank under eight feet of water and waves struck their homes.

    Robert Morrow, Environmental Historian and Research Director at Southeastern University, said: Tartoukube Research Center With Manchac.

    Louisiana has spent billions of dollars building embankments around Lake Maurepas and Lake Pontchartrain to protect urban and suburban areas from flooding …

    Strong winds were surprised even by long-time residents. They caused more destruction than Hurricane Isaac in 2012. This was the last catastrophe that hit the area, but I almost remembered it from the flood.

    As an embankment Rise in nearby communities It’s not Lake Maurepas, but climate change hits the Louisiana coast with stronger storms than ever before, and lakeside residents like Manchac are wondering who will save them from the next big storm.



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    A crushed house sits among the trees in Manchac, Louisiana, after the hurricane Ida struck nearly two weeks ago on Saturday, September 11, 2021. A combination of eight feet of storm surge and howling winds was built on the shores of the swamps of Lake Maurepas and caused enormous damage to camps in the area, which was only accessible by water.



    Like Bennett, most residents live part-time in the community. However, some people, especially those who live full-time as fishermen on the lake, live here all year round.

    Even by South Louisiana standards, it is an unstable place to call home.

    “When the water rises very fast, it only lifts a house that isn’t bolted strong enough,” said Greg Pizzolat, whose camp is north of Bennett.

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    Nearly 73% of the Parish of Tangipahoa was still weak on Monday after the hurricane Ida struck, but local leaders said they were starting …

    Pizorat’s camp was built on a quiet canal away from the main waterways and was obstructed by the towering mountains of frosted swamp grass, lumber and corrugated cardboard scraps. Large amounts of debris clogging swamps can take months to be removed, Morrow said.

    The Pizzolat house itself remained untouched — part of the tendency for storms to hit the house more violently in some pockets of the swamp than in others.

    “You can’t explain that,” said Kim Coates, a member of the Tangipahoa Parish Council, where the district includes Manchac.

    According to Pizzolat, he is willing to clean up the canal himself, even if it takes a few days.



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    On Saturday, September 11, 2021, the yacht sits biased in Manchac, Louisiana, after hurricane Ida struck nearly two weeks ago. Residents had just begun investigating damage to Manchac’s home over the weekend as high water and debris prevented it from entering the waterways shortly after the storm. Camps in this area are built into swamps and are only accessible by water.





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    The shattered roof and dock will be in Manchac, Louisiana on Saturday, September 11, 2021, after hurricane Ida wiped it out almost two weeks ago. The combination of eight feet of storm surge and howling winds has been incorporated into swamps and has caused enormous damage to camps in areas that are only accessible by water.



    Rebuilt after Hurricane Katrina and survived a powerful storm, the Tartur Cove Research Center survived Aida with minor visual damage, Morrow said. Almost 3 feet of water was poured into the building compared to the 1.5 feet of liquid caused by Isaac.

    Moreau resonated with residents like Bennett, calling Aida the most devastating weather event in Manchac landing in recent history. As a result, he results from the rapid global warming caused by humans burning fossil fuels.

    “We are seeing more and more storms, and more and more storms,” Morrow said. “And due to climate change, we can expect stronger storms as the seawater gets warmer. Hurricanes love warm water.”

    After spending a lifetime on the northeastern shore of Lake Maurepas, crab fisherman William “Billy” Bates is not a beginner in hurricanes. But nothing prepared him …

    According to Coates, the Tangipahoa Parish Council is working with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency has placed barges on swamps, metal, shattered wood, and more from wreckage-filled swamp water. I’m helping to get rid of the debris.

    Garbage was everywhere on Saturday, piled up on people’s porch, coastline, boats and rooftops. This is a mixture of man-made objects and twisted swamp vegetation. A plaster on the shattered wall floated among the uprooted weeds. Its mouth widened and a four-foot crocodile sunbathing on a board near the shore.

    Homeowners in the East Baton Rouge Parish and nine other dioceses were allowed to get a free temporary roof in the wake of Hurricane Ida …

    The Randy Hills camp in North Pass has lost windows taken out by the wind, a hut behind it flattened by trees and some of the shingles on his roof.

    He said he thought he was lucky when he worked to clear up piles of brushes from the dock and yard one after another.

    “It depends on how much you like living here,” Hills said. “In our case, we love it, so we’re going to rebuild it.”



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    Randy Hills and friends removed debris from a camp in Manchac, Louisiana on Saturday, September 11, 2021 after Hurricane Aida struck almost two weeks ago. The combination of eight feet of storm surge and howling winds caused enormous damage to camps in the area.





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    A crushed house sits among the trees in Manchac, Louisiana, after the hurricane Ida struck nearly two weeks ago on Saturday, September 11, 2021. The combination of eight feet of storm surge and howling winds has been incorporated into swamps and has caused enormous damage to camps in areas that are only accessible by water.





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    George Bennett picked up the hinged hut door of Hurricane Aida in Manchac, Louisiana on Saturday, September 11, 2021, after the storm passed through South Louisiana about two weeks ago. .. The combination of eight feet of storm surge and howling winds was incorporated into the swamps on the northeastern shore of Lake Maurepas, causing enormous damage to camps in the area, which is only accessible by water.



    Their camps blown away by Hurricane Ida, Lake Maurepas residents weigh rebuilding; ‘This is life’ | Environment Source link Their camps blown away by Hurricane Ida, Lake Maurepas residents weigh rebuilding; ‘This is life’ | Environment

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