Nature: Some East African sunbirds have been singing the same song for up to a MILLION years

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Talk about having a song in your head. Some East African sunbirds may have sung the same song for generations for a million years.

This is the conclusion of the university California, A Berkeley-led researcher who studied the isolated population of Southern Double-collared butterflies inhabiting alpine areas.

Bird barks It is traditionally thought to be easy to change, thanks to the methods inherited by mimicry.phone‘, Sensitive to distortion.

However, the team explained that this truth was derived primarily from the study of birds that inhabit the Northern Hemisphere.

These species have experienced highly variable environmental conditions over the last tens of thousands of years, with repeated glaciers.

This facilitated various evolutionary changes, affecting not only bird barks, but also feathers and mating behavior.

Populations of isolated birds inhabit the forested peaks of East Africa, such as Mount Kenya and Mount Kilimanjaro, but enjoy more static conditions.

And the team found that even though these habitats were tens of thousands or even millions of years apart, their birds still sang very similar songs.

They said that Sunbird’s songs do not change slowly over time, but rather such things appear to undergo long-term stagnation punctuation due to the rapid pulse of change.

Among the most diverse and colorful group of birds in Africa and Asia, sunbirds occupy a niche similar to that of the United States. Hummingbird — While sipping honey.

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Talk about having a song in your head. Some East African sunbirds may have sung the same song for generations for a million years.Photo: Southern double-collared butterfly of the genus Cinnyris studied by researchers

Talk about having a song in your head. Some East African sunbirds may have sung the same song for generations for a million years.Photo: Southern double-collared butterfly of the genus Cinnyris studied by researchers

The study was conducted by Rauri Bowie, an integrated biologist at the University of California, Berkeley, and his colleagues.

“Isolating humans often changes dialects. After a while, you can see where someone came from, and the song was interpreted in the same way,” explained Professor Bowie.

“Our paper shows that it doesn’t necessarily apply to birds.

‘Even with characteristics that should be very unstable [liable to change]Long-term stagnation can occur, such as singing and feathers.

Professor Bowie said he has long been fascinated by sunbirds. In particular, the isolated species at the top of the alpine is commonly known as the “Sky Island Sunbird”.

In previous studies, biologists have long thought of two species of eastern double-collared butterflies inhabiting several mountain peaks in East Africa, but actually represent five or six species. I showed that.

These birds still look similar, but show significant genetic differences due to their long-term isolation and evolution.

With this discovery, Professor Bowie wondered if the song would have remained the same as a bird in its wings.

Investigators visited the summits of 15 East African “sky islands” between 2007 and 2011 and recorded 123 bird songs for each of the six different eastern double-collared sunbird strains.

53034793 10411435 image m 43 1642445477688

53034793 10411435 image m 43 1642445477688

Researchers visited the summits of 15 East African “sky islands” between 2007 and 2011 and recorded 123 individual bird songs for each of the six eastern double-collared sunbird strains. did.Photo: Kenya, Malawi, Mozambique, Tanzania strain range

Researchers seem to have nothing to do with how far each population is from other populations, as the differences in Sky Island’s song are determined by differences in DNA profiles. I found that.

For example, two long-separated species were found to have about the same song, while the other two species were separated from each other because they were much less, but showed very different songs. rice field.

“What surprised me most in conducting this study was how similar these learned songs in isolated populations were within the species, and how obvious the differences between the songs were where they occurred. Was it, “said the paper author Jay McEntee.

‘first time [fellow researcher] Maneno Mbilinyi and I were recording Cinnyris fuelleborni (the so-called Fuelleborn sunbird). I thought there must be another bird nearby singing at the same time.

“The song we were listening to didn’t make sense to us.

“Look directly at the singing bird, see the beak move, [we] I couldn’t believe how different the song was from the really similar Morrow Sunbird, which I had just recorded elsewhere in the Uznwa Mountains. “

In contrast, biologists have said that the songs of the populations of Ikokoto in Tanzania and C. fuelleborni in Namri, Mozambique are almost the same, even though they have been isolated for hundreds of thousands of years.

Researchers seem to have nothing to do with how far each population is from other populations, as the differences in Sky Island

Researchers seem to have nothing to do with how far each population is from other populations, as the differences in Sky Island

Researchers seem to have nothing to do with how far each population is from other populations, as the differences in Sky Island’s song are determined by differences in DNA profiles. I found that.Photo: 6 lines on the left, typical feather pattern, center, ultrasonography of a typical song, right

Based on their findings, the team is characterized like feathers, and the songs they learn do not float in essentially isolated bird populations, but instead with sudden pulses that disrupt long-term consistency. He insisted that it could evolve.

“We show that this gradual change due to cultural or genetic drift is not seen at all, using a truly wonderful setup that allows us to see the evolution of the song using naturally isolated populations. “I am,” said Professor Bowie.

“There is plenty of evidence of stagnation, even if these abrupt changes in bird chirping-like traits and their traits need to be very plastic.

“For me, that was a really fascinating result,” he concluded.

With the first study completed, the team is now working in East Africa and what changes the tone of the bird while other species are happy to sign the same song for thousands of years. The goal is to decide.

The full findings of the study were published in the journal Bulletin of the Royal Society B: Biological Science..

53034797 10411435 image a 41 1642445422501

53034797 10411435 image a 41 1642445422501

“What surprised me most in conducting this study was how similar these learned songs in isolated populations were within the species, and how obvious the differences between the songs were where they occurred. Was it, “said the paper author Jay McEntee. ‘first time [fellow researcher] Maneno Mbilinyi and I were recording Cinnyris fuelleborni (the so-called Fuelleborn sunbird). I thought there must be another bird nearby singing at the same time. Depicted: Artist’s Impression C.fuelleborni

Birds use songs to communicate with other birds

Birds use their voice to communicate with other birds.

Sharp songs are an efficient way to communicate over long distances, especially when you live in a small, dense habitat such as the rainforest.

Most bird species use specific calls to identify themselves and convey nearby threats.

Birdsong is a special type of bark that many species use to aid in mating.

Bird chirping, which is almost exclusively a male activity, helps to show that the singer is healthy, healthy and ready to breed.

Nature: Some East African sunbirds have been singing the same song for up to a MILLION years Source link Nature: Some East African sunbirds have been singing the same song for up to a MILLION years

The post Nature: Some East African sunbirds have been singing the same song for up to a MILLION years appeared first on California News Times.

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