Implant helps woman control epileptic seizures – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

Date:

Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2021-10-08 21:13:00 –

Due to advances in the control of epileptic seizures, some people in this condition are living near normal lives. “They last from about 30 seconds to a minute and feel like imminent ruin and disorientation,” said 29-year-old Hannah Thomas, represented by random seizures, affecting about 3.5 million people in the United States. .. Thomas was a college student who was diagnosed with an epileptic seizure that was thought to be a panic attack. Days without them, and I want five a day, “Thomas said. For almost six years, her condition did not improve. “I learned after trying many drugs that my epilepsy is resistant to the drug,” she said. Medicine and surgery were not options, but I had another chance. Then Dr. Lao introduced me and said, “I think you are the perfect candidate.” I did my best. ” Dr. Lao, who she mentions, is Dr. Bliack Lao, a neurologist at the University of California, San Francisco. “Two-thirds of people can control their seizures with drugs. Unfortunately, Hannah wasn’t such a person, and her seizures continued,” he said. Lao recommended putting an implant in Hannah’s head to relieve the seizures. “Using a wire that goes into the brain, place the wire near the epicenter of the seizure, from the perspective of the earthquake, where the seizure occurred,” Lao said. At the onset of a seizure, and the unit sends an electrical pulse to the area to stop the seizure. “If you hear that a seizure is about to begin, you can respond to that detection by sending an electrical pulse to the focus of the seizure, and those pulses can be stopped on the truck before causing problems to the individual.” He said. , Implants were a godsend. “I slowly put my toes back into the pond. I’m going to continue my education. I’m more independent. I’m less afraid,” she said. Returning to her life before the seizures began, she was able to drive again thanks to her watching skills. “It’s like day and night. It’s like before I couldn’t see the light at the end of the tunnel, and now I feel like I know something.” Since implant surgery, Thomas has had few seizures and has been significantly reduced in severity. She has withheld her education and wants to go back to college to study social work.

Due to advances in the control of epileptic seizures, some people in this condition are living near normal lives.

“They last from about 30 seconds to a minute, and it just feels like imminent ruin and disorientation,” said 29-year-old Hannah Thomas.

Epilepsy is typified by random seizures and affects approximately 3.5 million people in the United States.

Thomas was diagnosed with an epileptic seizure when he was in college, thinking he had a panic attack.

“Sometimes I will spend a few days a day. I will spend the day without them and then I will have five a day,” said Thomas.

For almost six years, her condition did not improve.

“After trying many drugs, I learned that my epilepsy is resistant to drugs,” she said.

Dosing and surgery were not options, but there was another chance.

“And Dr. Lao introduced me and said,’I think you’re the perfect candidate.’ At that point, I had nothing else to lose, so I just chose it,” Thomas said. Said.

Dr. Rao she mentions is Vikram Rao, a neurologist at the University of California, San Francisco.

“Two-thirds of people can control their seizures with drugs. Unfortunately, Hannah wasn’t such a person. We tried a lot, but her seizures persisted. I did, “said Lao.

Lao recommended putting an implant in Hannah’s head to relieve Hannah’s seizures.

“Using the wires that enter the brain, from the perspective of the earthquake, place the wires near the epicenter of the seizure, where the seizures occur,” Lao said.

The monitor detects the onset of a seizure and the unit sends an electrical pulse to the area to stop the seizure.

“If you hear that a seizure is about to begin, you can respond to that detection by sending an electrical pulse to the focus of the seizure, and those pulses can be stopped on the truck before causing problems to the individual.” He said.

Implants were a godsend for Thomas.

“I’m slowly returning my toes to the pond. I’m going to continue my education. I’m more independent. I’m not too afraid,” she said.

And returning to her life before the onset of seizures involves being able to drive again thanks to the technology that monitors her.

“It’s like day and night. It’s like before I couldn’t see the light at the end of the tunnel, and now I feel like I know something is there,” she said.

Since implant surgery, Thomas has had few seizures and has been significantly reduced in severity.

She had put her education on hold and now wants to go back to college and study social work.

Implant helps woman control epileptic seizures Source link Implant helps woman control epileptic seizures

The post Implant helps woman control epileptic seizures – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania appeared first on Eminetra.

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