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    How warming affects Arctic sea ice, polar bears – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania

    Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 2021-11-06 17:49:00 –

    Polar bears are majestic, becoming more and more hungry and at risk of disappearing. Polar bears rely on melting sea ice on warming planets. Bears stand out. But where it lives, where it hunts, where it eats — it’s disappearing at its feet during the important summer months. Currently, he is the chief scientist of Polar Bear International. “There’s something special about polar bears.” Scientists and supporters warned other parts of the globe about polar bears marked as “threatening” on their list of endangered species. Pointed out as a signal. “” The ghosts of polar bears approach them as world leaders gather in Glasgow, Scotland, to step up efforts to curb climate change. Inger Andersen, head of the United Nations Environment Program, leads and monitors the International Union for Conservation of Nature. Classify the problematic species. She asks: “Do you want to be a generation that has seen the end of its ability to survive as magnificent as polar bears?” Sea ice conditions Arctic ice (frozen sea water) shrinks in the summer. It gets warmer and reshapes in the long winters. According to scientists, how much it shrinks is where global warming begins. Julienne Stroeve, a researcher at the University of Manitoba, said that the more the sea ice shrinks in the summer, the thinner the ice overall. This is because the ice is weak. Summer without sea ice is inevitable. Many other experts agree with her. Waled Abdalati, a former NASA Chief Scientist and now head environmental researcher at the University of Colorado, is one of them. “It’s like taking a sledgehammer to the climate system and doing something big about it.” Already, sea and air warming is done as if freight trains were moving. So, no matter what, the Earth is about to enter summer, with a small amount of less than one million square kilometers of sea ice scattered throughout the Arctic Circle. The big question is when the Arctic “looks like a blue sea”. , Director of the National Snow and Ice Data Center. Experts say that perhaps as early as the 2030s, perhaps in the 2040s, and almost certainly in the 2050s, the Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the world. In some seasons, warming is three times faster than in other parts of the globe, according to John Walsh, a scientist at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. This is due to what is called “Arctic Amplification”. Basically, the white ice in the Arctic reflects heat. According to scientists, when polar bears melt, the dark ocean absorbs much more heat, warming the ocean even more rapidly. Polar Bear Connections There are 19 different polar bear subpopulations in the Arctic Circle. Each is a little different. Some have problems, especially at the southernmost tip, while others are fairly stable. But “going to the Arctic and seeing what’s happening with my own eyes seems depressing,” said Christine Reidre, a marine biologist at the University of Washington who studied polar bears. Shrinking sea ice literally means shrinking polar bears. During the summer, polar bears support them during the winter by hunting, eating, eating feasts, and putting weight on the ice. According to Amstrap, they prefer areas that are more than half covered with ice. Because it is the most productive hunting and feeding ground. The more ice you have, the more you can move around and eat. Just 30-40 years ago, bears ate a seal and walrus buffet on ice. In the 1980s, “males were huge, females bred regularly, and the Cubs survived well,” he said. “The population looked good,” Amstrup said, saying bears aren’t doing well because of the loss of ice. One symptom: Polar bears are marine-adapted terrestrial mammals. The animals they eat (mainly seals and walruses) are aquatic animals. Bears usually work best when they can hunt in shallow water near land. Polar bears can grow hay in the presence of sea ice in these coastal waters. “Mr. Amstrap said. However, in recent years, sea ice has receded far offshore in most summers. As a result, bears are drifting on ice, drifting into prey-free deep waters (sometimes close to a mile), Amstrup said. Off the coast of Alaska, polar bears in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas show a clear contrast. “And you’re in a very unproductive area,” Amstrup said, miles off the coast of Prudhoe Bay in the Beaufort Sea. “It provides food for polar bears,” he said. But Beaufort bears “give us a really good early warning about where this is heading.” Future world leaders gather in Scotland to rush to curb climate change. Even when trying, see sea ice and polar bears know that a lot of warming has already begun. If the negotiators were successful and everything went well, experts said in the summer and 22nd century later this century. But until then, “the door was closed,” said Twila Moon, a scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center. So hope is melting. “It’s almost impossible for us to see places that are essentially inaccessible to sea ice.-Free Arctic, even if we could do the job of producing much lower emissions. “Mr. Moon said. “Sea ice is one of the things we see reaching a fairly devastating cyclone along the way, and we can already see their effects on polar bears.”

    Polar bears are majestic, increasingly hungry, at risk of disappearing, and dependent on sea ice, something that melts on warming planets.

    Polar bears stand out in the harsh and relentless Arctic Circle, where the frigid is a necessity, not just a way of life. But where it lives, where it hunts, where it eats — it disappears at its feet during the important summer.

    “They are always respected species and date back hundreds of years,” said Steven Amstrup, a long-time government polar bear researcher who is now the Chief Scientist at Polar Bear International. “There is something special about polar bears.”

    Scientists and supporters have pointed out the endangered species marked “Endangered” on the list of endangered species as a heated warning signal to other parts of the globe, the “cryosphere canary.” Polar bear ghosts approach them as world leaders gather in Glasgow, Scotland, to step up efforts to curb climate change.

    Inger Andersen, head of the United Nations Environment Program, led the International Union for Conservation of Nature, which monitors and classifies problematic species. She asks: “Do you want to be a generation that has seen the end of the ability of a magnificent polar bear to survive?”

    State of sea ice

    Arctic sea ice (frozen sea water) contracts as it gets warmer during the summer and reshapes in the long winters. According to scientists, how much it shrinks is where global warming begins. The more the sea ice shrinks in the summer, the weaker the ice in the first year, and the thinner the ice overall.

    Julienne Stroeve, a researcher at the University of Manitoba, says summer without sea ice is inevitable. Many other experts agree with her.

    Former NASA Chief Scientist Waled Abdalati is currently the head environmental researcher at the University of Colorado.

    “That’s something human civilization didn’t know,” Abdarati said. “It’s like bringing a sledgehammer into the climate system and doing something big about it.”

    Already, the warming of the sea and sky is carried out as if freight trains were moving. So, no matter what, the Earth is about to enter summer, with a small amount of less than one million square kilometers of sea ice scattered throughout the Arctic Circle.

    The big question is when the Arctic “looks like a blue sea,” said Mark Serreze, director of the National Snow and Ice Data Center.

    According to experts, probably as early as the 2030s, perhaps in the 2040s, and almost certainly by the 2050s.

    The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the world. In some seasons, warming is three times faster than in other parts of the globe, according to John Walsh, a scientist at the University of Alaska Fairbanks.

    It is due to what is called “Arctic Amplification”. Basically, the white ice in the Arctic reflects heat. According to scientists, when it melts, the dark sea absorbs much more heat, which warms the sea even faster.

    Polar bear connection

    There are 19 different subpopulations of polar bears in the Arctic. Each is a little different. Some have problems, especially at the southernmost tip, while others are fairly stable. However, their survival from place to place has a lot to do with sea ice.

    “It seems depressing to go to the Arctic and see what’s happening with your own eyes,” said Christine Reidre, a marine biologist at the University of Washington who studied polar bears in Baffin Bay. ..

    Shrinking sea ice literally means shrinking polar bears.

    During the summer, polar bears go out on ice to hunt, eat, feast, and put their weight on them to support them during the winter. According to Amstrap, they prefer areas that are more than half covered with ice. Because it is the most productive hunting and feeding ground. The more ice you have, the more you can move around and eat.

    Just 30 or 40 years ago, bears ate a seal and walrus buffet on ice.

    In the 1980s, “males were huge, females bred regularly, and Cubs survived well,” Amstrup said. “The population looked good.”

    Bears aren’t doing well because of the loss of ice, Amstrup said. One symptom: a high proportion of turnips, dying before the first birthday.

    Polar bears are terrestrial mammals adapted to the sea. The animals they eat—mainly seals and walruses—are aquatic.

    Bears usually work best when they can hunt in shallow water near land.

    “Polar bears can grow hay in the presence of sea ice in these coastal areas,” Amstrup said.

    However, in recent years, sea ice has receded far offshore most summers. This forced bears to drift over ice into the deep sea, sometimes close to a mile, where there was no prey, Amstrup said.

    Off the coast of Alaska, polar bears from the Beaufort Sea and the Chukchi Sea show a clear contrast.

    “We’re in a very unproductive area,” Amstrup said, 30-40 miles off the coast of Prudhoe Bay in the Beaufort Sea.

    Further south of the Chukchi, it becomes shallower and the walruses that feed from the bottom breed. He said it feeds polar bears.

    “The Chukchi bears seem to be doing pretty well because of their increased productivity,” Amstrup said. But Beaufort’s bear “provides us with a really good early warning about where this is heading.”

    future

    Scientists monitoring sea ice and polar bears have already begun a lot of warming, even when world leaders are gathering in Scotland to rush their efforts to curb climate change. I know that

    Experts say that if the negotiators are successful and everything goes well, the world could once again see the ice-rich Arctic Circle in the second half of this century and the 22nd century. But until then, “the door was closed,” said Twila Moon, a scientist at the National Snow and Ice Data Center.

    So hope is melting.

    “It’s almost impossible to find a place where you can’t reach the Arctic Circle without sea ice,” Moon said. .. “Sea ice is one of the things we see reaching a fairly devastating cyclone along the way, and we can already see their effects on polar bears.”

    How warming affects Arctic sea ice, polar bears Source link How warming affects Arctic sea ice, polar bears

    The post How warming affects Arctic sea ice, polar bears – Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania appeared first on Eminetra.

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