German researchers are working on the development of the next generation of smart textiles

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Researchers at the Leibniz Photonic Technology Institute (IPHT) in Jena, Germany, are developing a self-sufficient energy supply based on fibers. In this way, even in the absence of an external power source, it will be easier to supply energy to mobile electronic devices mounted near the body in the future.

Smart textiles use the warmth of the human body to convert it into electricity. The Leibniz Institute said in a press release that its cooling properties make the new material interesting for safety-related applications while improving comfort and comfort in wearing.

Smaller electronic devices that are worn on the body, so-called wearables, check important functions, count steps, and provide traffic and weather information. To continually power these technology companions, researchers at the Leibniz Photonic Technology Institute (Leibniz IPHT), along with the ITP team in Weimar, Germany, and E.CIMA, a Spanish textile manufacturer. The latest intelligent textiles use thermoelectric effects to convert the warmth of the body into electricity. The thermoelectric effect can be stored in the battery.

Researchers at the Leibniz Photonic Technology Institute (IPHT) in Jena, Germany, are developing a self-sufficient energy supply based on fibers. In this way, even in the absence of an external power source, it will be easier to supply energy to mobile electronic devices mounted near the body in the future.

“Our vision is to use textile materials to generate energy. Flexible, demand-focused and environmentally friendly, these smart fabrics are energy-sufficient mobile devices for consumer electronics and health applications. Smart watches and fitness bracelets are worn directly on the body and can be powered at any time. Vital parameters can be continuously measured and monitored, for example. ” Dr. Jonathan Plentz, Head of Photonic Thin Film Systems Research Group at Leibniz IPHT..

Jena’s power generation researchers use thermoelectric generators that convert the warmth of the body itself into electrical energy. For this purpose, a thin film coating in the form of zinc oxide doped with aluminum is applied to the fabric as a thermoelectric functional layer. Researchers have been able to measure the thermoelectric effect with an output of up to 0.2 μW due to the temperature difference between the user’s skin surface and the ambient temperature or the heat of industrial waste. The electricity generated can be stored in batteries to meet the energy needs of health and sports electronics. “This makes the device’s energy supply self-sufficient,” he said. Dr. Gabriele Schmid, Project Manager, Leibniz IPHT..

“Blast furnace workers are exposed to high levels of heat. Even for a short period of time, the ambient heat can significantly increase body temperature. Intelligent cooling fabrics built into protective clothing regulate body temperature better. In addition, textile materials are particularly breathable, lightweight and flexible, which not only has a positive effect on heat management, but also provides comfort in difficult work environments. ” Plentz explains.

Fiber2Fashion News Desk (RR)

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German researchers are working on the development of the next generation of smart textiles

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The post German researchers are working on the development of the next generation of smart textiles appeared first on Eminetra.

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