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    Australia will cancel Novak Djokovic’s visa again just days before the Australian Open

    Novak Djokovic faces deportation again after the Australian government I revoked my visa againThe latest twist on the ongoing story about whether the world’s top-ranked tennis players are allowed to compete despite being unvaccinated at the Australian Open. COVID-19 (new coronavirus infection)..

    Immigration Minister Alex Hawke said Friday he used his minister’s discretion to cancel the 34-year-old Selve’s visa for public interest-Djokovic’s record for his 20 Grand Slam titles. Just three days before the start of play at the Australian Open, which won nine. Djokovic is the British Open defending champion and is aiming for the 21st Grand Slam singles title in the men’s record.

    Three hours later, Djokovic’s lawyer began appealing for visa cancellation at overtime hearings in the Federal Circuit and Family Court. At the hearing, the same judge, Anthony Kelly, Last week we ruled in favor of Djokovic For procedural reasons after the visa was first canceled when he landed at Melbourne Airport.

    Serbian tennis player Novak Djokovic practices at Melbourne Park
    Tennis star Novak Djokovic will practice at Melbourne Park prior to the Australian Open on January 14, 2022.

    AAP image / Diego Fedele via Reuters


    His lawyer, Nick Wood, told Kelly that he wanted the appeal to be filed on Sunday and Djokovic wants to return his visa in time to play on Monday.

    Under government-sponsored conditions, Jokovic remains free on Friday nights, but when he meets Australian Border Force (immigrant) officials on Saturday at 8 am local time (Friday 4 pm EST), the facts are true. Return to the upper immigration camp.

    He spent the morning at a law firm under the supervision of border forces and returned to the hotel detention center on Saturday afternoon.

    Deportation from Australia may result in a three-year ban on return, but may be exempt in some circumstances.

    Djokovic’s lawyer needs to give him two emergency orders. One is an injunction to prevent his deportation, like the order he got last week. The second is for Hawk to give Djokovic a visa to play.

    “The secondary order is almost unprecedented,” said Kian Bourne, a Melbourne-based immigration lawyer. “Courts rarely order members of government agencies to issue visas.”

    Mr. Hawk said he had canceled Djokovic’s visa “for the public good, for the sake of health and order.”

    “The Morrison government is committed to protecting the Australian border, especially in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic,” Hawk said in a statement, referring to Prime Minister Scott Morrison.

    Morrison welcomed Djokovic’s pending deportation and said Australia had achieved one of the world’s lowest pandemic mortality rates, strongest economy, and highest vaccination rate.

    “Australian people have made many sacrifices during this pandemic, and they naturally expect the consequences of those sacrifices to be protected,” Morrison said in a statement. “This is what the minister is doing to take this action today.”

    Deportation is usually prohibited from returning to Australia for three years.

    Despite the uncertainties that Djokovic has, the open organizer has included the tournament’s top seeds in the draw. He will face 78th-ranked Serbian Miomir Kecmanovic in the opening round and continues to practice, including a Friday session hours before Hawk’s decision is announced.

    Djokovic’s exemption from the COVID-19 vaccination requirement was approved by the Victorian Government and the tournament organizer Tennis Australia. It clearly allowed him to receive a visa to travel.

    However, the Australian Border Force refused the tax exemption and canceled the visa upon arrival in Melbourne. Djokovic stayed at an immigration detention hotel for four nights before the judge overturned the decision on Monday.

    Djokovic’s position is itself part of a larger global debate over the rights of unvaccinated people.

    Morrison is running for reelection, and his government’s response to the Djokovic visa situation has hurt what has been generally admired in some areas for its strict position on intra-pandemic and pre-pandemic border security. rice field.

    Australia will cancel Novak Djokovic’s visa again just days before the Australian Open

    Source link Australia will cancel Novak Djokovic’s visa again just days before the Australian Open

    The post Australia will cancel Novak Djokovic’s visa again just days before the Australian Open appeared first on Eminetra.

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