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    Alzheimer’s: Daily power walks could help stave off the onset of disease, study claims

    According to one study, daily power walks and biking in old age may reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

    Studies have long shown that exercise after middle age can reduce the likelihood of dementia most commonly caused by Alzheimer’s disease by up to 40 percent.

    Currently a university researcher California People say that if they exercise later in their lives, they can prevent their illness.

    Exercise is thought to help stop the disease by improving cognitive function, keeping weight low, and preventing plaque formation in the arteries, which is the main cause of vascular dementia.

    However, the latest research also suggests that later exercise may reduce inflammation in the brain and cause Alzheimer’s disease.

    The researchers surveyed 167 people with an average age of 90 at the time of death.

    People who exercised regularly had lower levels of activation of microglia (cells that can cause inflammation) in the brain.

    Scientists say this helped significantly reduce the risk of Alzheimer’s disease.

    Doctors recommend that healthy adults do at least 150 moderate exercises or 75 minutes of intense aerobic exercise per week.

    According to a University of California study, daily power walks may help reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer

    According to a University of California study, daily power walks may help reduce the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease.

    Dementia and Alzheimer

    Dementia and Alzheimer

    Dementia and Alzheimer’s disease were the largest murderers in the UK in October, according to data released yesterday by the National Bureau of Statistics.

    According to a study by the University of Washington School of Medicine, the number of cases of dementia worldwide is expected to nearly triple from 57.4 million to 152.8 million by 2050. However, the rate at which disease is expected to increase depends on different parts of the world. In Western Europe, the number of cases is expected to increase by 75%, primarily due to the aging of the population, while in North America it is expected to double. The largest increase is expected to be seen in North Africa and the Middle East, with cases projected to increase by 375 percent.

    According to a study by the University of Washington School of Medicine, the number of cases of dementia worldwide is expected to nearly triple from 57.4 million to 152.8 million by 2050. However, the rate at which disease is expected to increase depends on different parts of the world. In Western Europe, the number of cases is expected to increase by 75%, primarily due to the aging of the population, while in North America it is expected to double. The largest increase is expected to be seen in North Africa and the Middle East, with cases projected to increase by 375 percent.

    According to a study by the University of Washington School of Medicine, the number of cases of dementia worldwide is expected to nearly triple from 57.4 million to 152.8 million by 2050. However, the rate at which disease is expected to increase depends on different parts of the world. In Western Europe, the number of cases is expected to increase by 75%, primarily due to the aging of the population, while in North America it is expected to double. The largest increase is expected to be seen in North Africa and the Middle East, with cases projected to increase by 375 percent.

    What is Alzheimer’s disease?

    Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive degenerative disease that causes the death of nerve cells when abnormal proteins accumulate.

    This confuses the transmitter carrying the message and causes the brain to contract.

    This affects about 920,000 people in the UK, and this figure is expected to increase to 2 million by 2050.

    what happens?

    When brain cells die, they lose their function.

    It includes memory, direction, thinking and reasoning abilities.

    The disease progresses slowly and slowly.

    On average, patients live 5-7 years after diagnosis, but some patients live 10-15 years.

    Initial symptoms:

    • Loss of short-term memory
    • Disorientation.
    • Behavioral changes
    • Uneven mood
    • Difficulty in handling money and calling

    Later symptoms:

    • Severe memory loss, close family, forgetting familiar objects and places
    • Inability to understand the world can lead to anxiety and frustration, leading to aggressive behavior
    • Eventually you lose the ability to walk
    • You may have a problem eating
    • The majority will eventually need 24 hours of care

    Source: Alzheimer’s Disease Association

    A California study published in Journal of NeuroscienceIt turns out that exercise has brought the greatest benefits to those who are more likely to develop dementia.

    Researchers have been tracking adults since 1997 to investigate the relationship between physical activity and microglial activation.

    Dr. Kaitlins Casaletto, Principal Author of the University of California, San Francisco, said:

    “But too much activation can cause inflammation, damage neurons, and interfere with brain signaling.

    “Exercise helps reduce abnormal activation of animals, but the connection has not been established in humans.”

    Participants were from the Rush Memory and Aging Project, which enrolls dementia-free volunteers who agree to donate organs.

    Almost two-thirds (60 percent) had Alzheimer’s disease by the time of their death.

    Participants wore a 24-hour activity monitor for up to 10 days just prior to the annual cognitive test.

    Researchers measured microglial activation of brain tissue and Alzheimer’s disease after the participants died.

    Dr. Casalet said:

    “This was especially in the inferior temporal gyrus — the area of ​​the brain that was most hit by Alzheimer’s disease.

    “Physical activity had a more pronounced effect on inflammation in people with more severe Alzheimer’s disease.”

    The study did not specify how long participants exercised or how much exercise reduced the likelihood of Alzheimer’s disease.

    Dr. Casalet then plans to investigate whether exercise intervention can alter microglial activation in patients with Alzheimer’s disease.

    She added: ‘Physical activity is associated with improved cognitive aging and reduced risk of neurodegenerative diseases.

    “However, the cellular and molecular pathways that connect human behavior to the brain are unknown.

    “We objectively monitored physical activity and cognitive abilities in life and quantified microglial activation and synaptic markers in brain tissue at the time of death in the elderly.

    ‘These are the first data to support the activation of microglia as a physiological pathway in which physical activity is associated with human brain health.

    “Although more intervention is needed, physical activity suggests that it may be a modifiable behavior that is utilized to reduce pro-inflammatory microglial conditions in humans.”

    Alzheimer’s disease is the most common cause of dementia, affecting approximately 920,000 people in the United Kingdom, and this figure is expected to reach 2 million by 2050.

    According to data from the Office for National Statistics, it is the largest murderer in the UK, with 102 deaths per 100,000 last month and double the number of deaths in Covid (51 per 100,000). ..

    It is steadily increasing due to longevity. The number of cases worldwide is estimated to triple to more than 150 million over the next 30 years.

    There is no cure for the condition, and doctors say that lifestyle changes are the best things people can do to help avoid developing it.

    Alzheimer’s: Daily power walks could help stave off the onset of disease, study claims Source link Alzheimer’s: Daily power walks could help stave off the onset of disease, study claims

    The post Alzheimer’s: Daily power walks could help stave off the onset of disease, study claims appeared first on California News Times.

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